AFEEL INTERNATIONAL

Enabling Children To Reach Their Full Potential

 

ACADEMIC Information



Admission


AFEEL accepts enrolments for boys and girls into all classes from Play School to Year XIII (Grade 12). Our academic year commences in September each year.



Discipline


The aim of the AFEEL is to create a social climate that is encouraging and positive in response to the needs of students. Keeping this in mind, we have implemented a set of rules. Please read.



Assessment


The AFEEL uses regular testing and assessment as ongoing activities in teaching and learning. In December and June there are formal examinations with test work done over a longer period. These examinations are an important feature of the school year. This allows teachers, parents and children to clearly see how much progress has been made. Report Cards are issued following the examinations and are collected on Open House Days when parents have the opportunity to discuss their child’s progress with the teachers concerned. There are additional Parent Teacher Conferences in October and March.


At the end of Key Stages One, Two and Three, the AFEEL uses the British Standard Assessment Tests in English, Mathematics and Science in order to make an assessment using recognised national standards.

(You may see in the British Press references to changes or even abolition of SATs in the near future. This is the result of an ongoing political debate about educational practice which has centred on the fact that SATs tests have been used to create ‘League Tables’ of schools. This obviously does not affect our use of the Tests.)



Curriculum


At the AFEEL, we recognise that many of our pupils have been in different school systems in a number of countries. For parents who do not know the English school system we invite you to take a few minutes to familiarise yourself with its all-round structure.


Nursery, pre-school and kindergarten are known as the Foundation Stage. The lessons and activities are designed to encourage personal, social and emotional development. Here, the students learn the basics of communication, language; mathematical development; understanding of the world and also physical and creative development.

In England, compulsory education begins during the academic year (September – July) in which children celebrate their 4th birthday. This is known as the Reception Year and the children follow a programme of learning and activities similar to those in the Foundation Stage.

The formal programme of studies begins with Year 2 during the academic year in which the child has its 6th birthday. The English system of studies is divided into four key stages.



Primary & Secondary School


PRIMARY SCHOOL:
KEY STAGE 1 – YEAR 1 AND 2
KEY STAGE 2 – YEAR 3, 4, 5 AND 6

SECONDARY SCHOOL
KEY STAGE 3 – YEARS 7, 8 & 9
KEY STAGE 4 - YEARS 10, 11, 12, & 13 (IGCSC & A levels)



We teach the following subjects under IGCSC:

  • English - The 1st & 2nd Language
  • French
  • Mathematics
  • Additional Mathematics
  • Physics
  • Chemistry
  • Biology
  • Business Studies
  • ICT
    (Information and Communication Technology)
  • Geography
  • History
  • Economics


English Curriculum

English is the most spoken language in the world and international communications mostly use the English language. Keeping this in mind, English is vital for communicating with others in school and in the wider world, and is fundamental to learning in all subjects. In studying English, students develop skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing which they will need to participate in society. Students learn to express themselves creatively and imaginatively and to communicate confidently and effectively.

Literature in English is rich and influential. It reflects the experiences of people from many countries and times. Students learn to become enthusiastic and critical readers of stories, poetry and drama as well as non-fiction and media texts. They gain access to the world of knowledge that reading opens up. Looking at the patterns, structures, origins and conventions of the English language helps students understand how the language works. Using this understanding, students can then choose and adapt what they say and write to different situations. They also develop the ability to appreciate and interpret the choices made by other writers and speakers.

KEY STAGE ONE

In the first two years of primary school, students learn the principles of how to speak clearly, fluently and confidently. They begin to understand the importance of diction and intonation. Listening skills are learned as students acquire the capacity to concentrate, remember specific pieces of information and recognise simple sound patterns such as rhyme.

In classroom activities they learn how to take part in discussions by making contributions relevant to the material and developing ideas in the light of what others have said. Through drama, they begin to explore how situations, moods and characters can be conveyed through role play and acting. By telling stories, reading and reciting, students develop specific speaking skills. Using the phonic method, students are taught the basics of writing: the alphabet, recognising words and common spelling patterns. They learn the principles of word order and sentence structure. Stories and poems set in both familiar and fantasy worlds are used in class to develop the student’s awareness of writing in a variety of cultures. Simple composition exercises help the students learn the skills of sentence structure and appropriate communication. Planning and reviewing of writing is integral to our teaching. The basic rules of grammar and punctuation (question marks, commas, full stops, and capital letters) are taught at this stage. Students learn how to write both single and joined letters of a regular shape and size.

KEY STAGE TWO

In Years Three, Four, Five and Six, English classes build on the basic skills acquired in Key Stage One through intensive use of literature, spelling, grammar, comprehension and creative writing.

Speaking skills include the use of humour, exaggeration, persuasive language and vocabulary to communicate complex meanings. Listening skills develop the student’s capacity to identify the key points and details of a discussion and to follow up ideas with appropriate questions. They learn how to differentiate between language which is for instruction, entertainment or persuasion.

Through group discussion activities, students learn the difference between exploration of ideas, making comments, evaluating, judging and qualifying ideas. They learn how to accept varying points of view and deal with them politely while attempting to reach agreements and move the debate on.

Drama and script writing provide opportunities to develop techniques in exploring character and issues, and conveying themes and emotions to an audience. Language skills include the recognition of Standard English and dialect forms in addition to the variations between transcription, direct and indirect speech. Reading skills are developed using the phonic method and detailed study of grammatical structures. Students learn how read into texts (inference and deduction) and how to scan texts for information. They gradually learn to distinguish between fact and opinion and how to consider an argument critically.Using a variety of literature, students learn how to appreciate the creation of character and plot in writing, how themes are developed and how to distinguish between author, narrator and character. They learn how to express their own preferences and support their views by reference to texts.

Vocabulary skills are developed through comparison of explanation, instruction and description and the use and effect of specialist vocabulary. This is achieved by reading myths, legends, traditional stories, diaries, autobiographies, letters and both modern and classical poetry to familiarise students with a wide variety of writing. Writing and composition skills are essential for success not only in English but in many other subjects. In Key Stage Two, students learn how to plan, draft, revise, proof read and present a final copy. They become aware of how writing, like speaking, is related to specific purposes. The more complex rules and conventions of grammar and punctuation and spelling are taught. They learn complex sentences, clauses, phrases, word families, roots and origins of words, prefixes and suffixes, appropriate use of statements, question and command, word classes and the grammatical functions of words.

KEY STAGE THREE:

In the Secondary School, English classes build up the skills acquired during Key Stage Two. It is imperative that the students have developed a certain accuracy and fluency in the English language by the age of eleven or twelve if they are to profit from the programme which is offered either here at the AFEEL or elsewhere in the English speaking world. The emphasis in all subjects is upon exploring ideas and questions; challenging ideas and assumptions, analysing information and making informed judgements which are clearly and cogently argued. Skills and ability in language will be constantly reviewed and assessed by all teachers.Speaking and listening skills include the preparation of formal presentations and debate as well as the use of improvisation in drama. Reading materials include texts which have influenced culture and thought, down the ages as well as contemporary literature. Students are exposed to writing from a variety of cultures and traditions including African authors such as Chinua Achebe and Doris Lessing as well as classical English authors. At this stage, students will become familiar with the styles of journalism, travel writing, literary non-fiction, polemic, commentary, essay and short story.

In writing, students are encouraged to develop ideas, use imagery, and create settings and characters in composition. They learn to become more confident in using appropriate vocabulary to analyse, evaluate and develop their skills in logical and persuasive writing.

English is a global language and it is important that students learn to recognise how Standard English varies in both its spoken and written forms across the world. Similarly, they also become aware of how the language is developing and changing in response to cultures and technologies. There are many ways in which you can help your child to succeed in English. If English is not your first language spoken at home then it is advisable to use your mother tongue rather than mix English with another language in daily conversation. However, there can be times when you use the English language. For example, when following a news programme, documentary or film on an English language television channel, you can talk to your children about what they are seeing and hearing. This would be a good time to ask them questions and discuss the material presented. Pease ensure that your home has a Standard English dictionary. Oxford, Cambridge, Collins and Longman publishers have a wide range of dictionaries for all ages and purposes. The AFEEL has a stock of Primary and Secondary School dictionaries which may be purchased. We are aware of the lack of printed English material available locally but the school does possess a library and you should ask your child regularly about what he or she is reading beyond class texts and assigned work. Listening to the BBC World Service and reading the BBC News website will be of invaluable help not only in developing vocabulary, reading and listening skills but will also help your child become more knowledgeable about Current Affairs, Politics, Economics, Science, Geography and Culture.

In addition, there are hundreds of educational websites which may be used to help with and to supplement school work. Some of these include :

BBC Bitesize  BBC Skillwise

Crick Web

How to learn English

Schools net Teaching Ideas

Cambridge Dictionaries Online

Woodlands Junior School

NOTE: If you surf the net for material and activities use www.google.co.uk and then click on ‘search for pages from the UK’. Otherwise you will fall upon thousands of sites from America which will not necessarily use standard British spelling.


French Curriculum

Language is a tool of communication and we believe that it is very important that our students be able to express themselves and understand what others say using French, one of the official languages of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The emphasis is on learning how to speak the language fluently. All our French teachers are native speakers who have French as their first language. Classes are conducted in French and as little English as possible is used. Accuracy in pronunciation and the correct use of idiomatic French, both in oral and written work, is a priority for us at the AFEEL. French is not a compulsory subject in many English Primary Schools but for the reasons outlined above it is taught at the AFEEL from Year 1 onwards.

KEYS STAGES ONE AND TWO:

In the Primary School years, the emphasis is on oral communication (using correct pronunciation and intonation) and listening skills (being able to distinguish sounds and meanings). Reading and writing in the foreign language are introduced slowly and gradually. Students learn the vocabulary and grammatical structures to be able to talk about themselves and their family; where they live; their interests; their likes and dislikes.

Functional topics such as travel, shopping, eating and drinking, television and recreational activities are explored using basic vocabulary and simple grammatical structures. During these years, students will learn how to initiate conversation and learn how to ask and respond to simple questions : Who, Where and What. The use of English-French / French-English dictionaries will be encouraged. Students will also be introduced to aspects of culture and society in the various countries where French is the official language.

KEY STAGE THREE:

The four linguistic skills: listening; speaking; reading and writing receive more detailed attention in Key Stage Three. This is achieved through a more formal approach to the teaching of grammar and its application. The range of vocabulary and idiomatic language covers the use of language in everyday practical situations. It is also extended to facilitate the expression of ideas, thoughts and feelings. As always, in modern language teaching, the emphasis is upon effective communication through dialogue, role play and creative writing. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the relationship between language and society. By looking at countries where French is spoken, they will learn to understand the finer points of other cultures, new ways of looking at the world and the diversity of life which makes up the human family.


Mathematics Curriculum

Mathematics is a creative discipline and mathematical thinking is important for all members of modern society. It’s useful in the workplace, business and finance; and for personal decision making too. The language of mathematics is international. The subject transcends cultural boundaries and its importance is universally recognised. The study of mathematics should enable students to apply their knowledge, skills and understanding to relevant real-world situations. In the early years of math teaching, the emphasis is on mental arithmetic rather than written work.

The Study Of Mathematics Includes:

KEY STAGE ONE AND TWO:
YEARS 2, 3, 4, 5 AND 6:

  • Numbers TO 1000
  • Addition to 1000 then 10,000
  • Subtraction to 1000 then 10,000
  • Multiplication and division by 2,3, 4, 5 and 10
  • Fractions and decimals, Percentages
  • Time, Money
  • Number Properties
  • Measures: Area, Lenght, Weight, Capacity
  • 2D and 3D Shapes
  • Position, Movement and Angle
  • Data Handling

KEY STAGE THREE:

Numbers and Algebra:

  • Rational Numbers, their properties and their different representations
  • Rules of Arithmetic applied to calculations and manipulations with rational numbers
  • Applications of Ration and Proportion, Accuracy and Rounding
  • Linear Equations, Formulae, Expressions and Identities
  • Analytical, Graphical and Numerical methods for solving equations
  • Polynomial Graphs, Sequences and Functions

Geometry and Measures:

  • Properties of 2D and 3D shapes
  • Constructions, Loci and Bearings
  • Pythagoras’ Theorem
  • Transformations, Similarity, including the use of scale points
  • Units, Compound measures and Conversions
  • Perimeters, Areas, Surface Areas and Volumes

    Statistics:

  • The handling data -Presentation and analysis of grouped and ungrouped data
  • Experimental and Theoretical probabilities, including those based on equally likely outcomes

Math Drills

Mad for Maths


Science Curriculum

The study of Science fires the student’s curiosity about phenomenon in the world around them and offers opportunities to explain the same. It engages learners at many levels, linking direct practical experience with scientific ideas. Students discover how scientific ideas contribute to technological changes affecting industries, business and medicine and how it improves the quality of life.

The curriculum is divided into Three Key Stages, with the topics as follows:

KEY STAGE ONE AND TWO:

YEARS 1, 2, 3, 4 AND 5:

  • The human body, balanced diet, keeping healthy
  • Using materials, forces, magnets
  • Electricity, light, sound
  • Study of plants
  • Rocks and soils, changing states

YEAR 6:

  • Interdependence and adaptation
  • Micro-organisms (short unit), reversible and irreversible changes (short unit)
  • More about dissolving
  • Forces in action
  • How do we see things (short unit)
  • Changing circuits (short unit)

KEY STAGE THREE:

Year 7:

  • Cells, reproduction
  • Environment and feeding relationships, variation and classification
  • Acids and alkalis, simple chemical reactions, particle model of solids, liquids and gases, solutions
  • Energy resources, electrical circuits, forces and their effects
  • The solar system and beyond

Year 8:

  • Food and digestion, respiration, microbes and disease
  • Ecological relationships
  • Atoms and elements, compounds and mixtures
  • Rocks and weathering, rock cycles
  • Heating and cooling
  • Magnets and electromagnets
  • Light
  • Sound and hearing

Year 9:

  • Inheritance and selection
  • Fit and healthy
  • Plants and photosynthesis, plants for food
  • Reactions of metals and metal compounds, patterns of reactivity, environmental chemistry
  • Using chemistry
  • Energy and electricity, pressure and moments
  • Gravity and space, speeding up

Woodlands Junior : Science

Census at School

Census at School


Science Curriculum

The study of Science fires the student’s curiosity about phenomenon in the world around them and offers opportunities to explain the same. It engages learners at many levels, linking direct practical experience with scientific ideas. Students discover how scientific ideas contribute to technological changes affecting industries, business and medicine and how it improves the quality of life.

The curriculum is divided into Three Key Stages, with the topics as follows:

KEY STAGE ONE AND TWO:

YEARS 1, 2, 3, 4 AND 5:

  • The human body, balanced diet, keeping healthy
  • Using materials, forces, magnets
  • Electricity, light, sound
  • Study of plants
  • Rocks and soils, changing states

YEAR 6:

  • Interdependence and adaptation
  • Micro-organisms (short unit), reversible and irreversible changes (short unit)
  • More about dissolving
  • Forces in action
  • How do we see things (short unit)
  • Changing circuits (short unit)

KEY STAGE THREE:

Year 7:

  • Cells, reproduction
  • Environment and feeding relationships, variation and classification
  • Acids and alkalis, simple chemical reactions, particle model of solids, liquids and gases, solutions
  • Energy resources, electrical circuits, forces and their effects
  • The solar system and beyond

Year 8:

  • Food and digestion, respiration, microbes and disease
  • Ecological relationships
  • Atoms and elements, compounds and mixtures
  • Rocks and weathering, rock cycles
  • Heating and cooling
  • Magnets and electromagnets
  • Light
  • Sound and hearing

Year 9:

  • Inheritance and selection
  • Fit and healthy
  • Plants and photosynthesis, plants for food
  • Reactions of metals and metal compounds, patterns of reactivity, environmental chemistry
  • Using chemistry
  • Energy and electricity, pressure and moments
  • Gravity and space, speeding up

Woodlands Junior : Science

Census at School

Census at School


Science Curriculum

The study of Science fires the student’s curiosity about phenomenon in the world around them and offers opportunities to explain the same. It engages learners at many levels, linking direct practical experience with scientific ideas. Students discover how scientific ideas contribute to technological changes affecting industries, business and medicine and how it improves the quality of life.

The curriculum is divided into Three Key Stages, with the topics as follows:

KEY STAGE ONE AND TWO:

YEARS 1, 2, 3, 4 AND 5:

  • The human body, balanced diet, keeping healthy
  • Using materials, forces, magnets
  • Electricity, light, sound
  • Study of plants
  • Rocks and soils, changing states

YEAR 6:

  • Interdependence and adaptation
  • Micro-organisms (short unit), reversible and irreversible changes (short unit)
  • More about dissolving
  • Forces in action
  • How do we see things (short unit)
  • Changing circuits (short unit)

KEY STAGE THREE:

Year 7:

  • Cells, reproduction
  • Environment and feeding relationships, variation and classification
  • Acids and alkalis, simple chemical reactions, particle model of solids, liquids and gases, solutions
  • Energy resources, electrical circuits, forces and their effects
  • The solar system and beyond

Year 8:

  • Food and digestion, respiration, microbes and disease
  • Ecological relationships
  • Atoms and elements, compounds and mixtures
  • Rocks and weathering, rock cycles
  • Heating and cooling
  • Magnets and electromagnets
  • Light
  • Sound and hearing

Year 9:

  • Inheritance and selection
  • Fit and healthy
  • Plants and photosynthesis, plants for food
  • Reactions of metals and metal compounds, patterns of reactivity, environmental chemistry
  • Using chemistry
  • Energy and electricity, pressure and moments
  • Gravity and space, speeding up

Woodlands Junior : Science

Census at School

Census at School


Geography curriculum

Children love to know about life in other parts of the world and discover how things came to be. In geography, students learn about the physical world (the lands and seas of our planet) and the problems which confront it (pollution, non renewable resources); we learn about the climate and its changes; and the life of people in relation to their environment and resources.

Studying geography will help students understand how our planet exists and how we live on it. It helps them become more responsible in their human activities by caring about the world (questions of environment and ecology) and being more aware of the many different ways of life that people have around the globe.

At all stages, students will constantly develop their skills in asking and answering the fundamental questions of geography: what/where is it? What is it like? How did it get there? They will become increasingly familiar with the specialised vocabulary of the subject and learn how to interpret maps, photographs and diagrams.

KEY STAGE ONE:

  • Learning about where we live: lubumbashi (around the school and the locality) Daily life in India and England
  • Transport, commerce, housing, the weather and climate. Places we go on holiday: countryside (hills, mountains, and rivers), seaside (cliffs, beaches and seas), cities (tourist attractions), and nature reserves (animals and outdoor activities)

KEY STAGE TWO:

  • Understanding about the world around us: the earth in the universe (planets, atmosphere, days and seasons)
  • Town and village life in Africa, Asia and Europe (population distribution)
  • Economic activity and environmental issues (farming and industries), river systems, seas and oceans, mountain building, earthquakes and volcanoes
  • Food and water around the world
  • Introduction to detailed mapping using a variety of Atlas', images, and ordnance survey

KEY STAGE THREE:

Year 7:

  • A detailed study of the united kingdom - physical and economic geography including changing patterns of industry, climate, coastal management and environmental/ecological issues

Year 8:

  • European geography including weather, rivers, farming, energy, glacial erosion, water and detailed studies related to France, Germany, Sweden, the UK and Spain

Year 9:

World geography including climate hazards, tectonics, population, urbanisation and migration, tourism, ecology in the tropics and detailed studies in relation to Bangladesh, Kenya and the United States. You can help your child to learn more about issues and questions in geography by taking advantage of the many programmes shown on television channels such as national geographic, discovery and planet. Ask them questions about what they have seen and talk to them about the different places you have lived in or visited. There are hundreds of websites which are useful for developing geographical skills and knowledge. In addition to the usual online encyclopaedias, here are just a few of them:

BBC Schools

Google Earth

National Geographic

Geographical Association

Volcano Live

USGS Earthquake Hazards Program

Meto-Government BBC Weather

Geograph

Environmental News Network WWF Panda

Oxfam Cool Planet


History Curriculum

The study of history will help students learn about how societies developed and to understand why certain events happened. They will gradually come to understand how events in the past had different causes and results and how the way we live today is a result of what happened in the past. Recognising that our students come from a wide variety of backgrounds we will make every effort to study topics from the history of Asia, Africa and Europe.

Key stage one:

How people lived in the past:

  • Childhood and family life in ancient, medieval and modern times
  • Housing, transport, agriculture and food through the ages
  • Clothing and fashions
  • Religions and cultures
  • Famous people from the past

Key stage two:

  • Ancient civilisations: Tigris and Euphrates; Egypt; Indus Valley; China; Greece and Rome
  • Celtic, Anglo-Saxon, Tudor and Victorian Britain
  • Empires and kingdoms in the Congo: Kongo, Luba, Chokwe, Lunda, Songe
  • Hindu society in ancient India
  • Mohammed and development of the Muslim world

Key stage three:

  • England from the Norman Conquest to the 14th Century: Politics, Religion and Society
  • Elizabethan and Stuart England: the religious settlement, foreign policy, the civil war and the Hanoverian succession
  • The Industrial Revolution in the United Kingdom
  • The growth of the British Empire
  • Islamic Spain
  • The Mughal Empire in India
  • Ancient African kingdoms: Sahel, Nigeria, Central Africa

You can help your child become more knowledgeable about the topics we study in history by encouraging them to read extensively and by using your television as an educational resource. Channels such as Animal Planet, Discovery and National Geographic often have documentaries and films which can help us understand how people have lived in different parts of the world. The internet is an invaluable source for reading materials: online encyclopaedias such as Wikipedia, Britannica, Love To Know, Absolute Astronomy are very useful, not only for history but for all subjects. We recommend:

BBC Schools

English Monarchs

British Museum

Manchester Museum

Copyright © 2017 AFEEL . All rights reserved . No part of this website may be copied or replicated without permission
ABOUT   CONTACT   CAREERS
Sitemap . Disclaimer . Legal Notice . Terms & Conditions